The Faces of PSA – Meet Josh McShane

Faces of PSA - josh mcshaneName: Joshua A. McShane

Title: CVG Base Administrator/ Operations Coordinator

How long have you worked for PSA? I’ve worked for PSA for 9 months.

How long have you been in the airline industry? I’ve been in the Airline Industry for 10 years this September.

Give us a brief overview of what you do: I oversee the administrative functions of the Cincinnati base. I ensure our crews have what they need to get the job done. I take time every day to go out and say hello to every PSA plane that comes into a gate.

What is one of the biggest challenges of your job? Being my first year in an office, I’ve had to re-learn what I thought I knew on time management and organization.

How many roles have you had at PSA? Which is your favorite? This is my first and so far, favorite role here at PSA, and if I may say it’s my favorite so far in the industry!

Where’s your favorite place you have traveled? Athens Greece for sure. The history and peoples’ hospitality are unmatched.

What are some of your hobbies? Volunteering, museum sightseeing, trying new restaurants and most of all, flying. My favorite museum so far is the Cincinnati Art Museum. The Louvre is a close second.

What do you love about working for PSA? My boss Debra Hoke [Director of InFlight]. I’ve never had a boss like her and I don’t think I will again. All joking aside.

Why would you recommend PSA? I’d recommend PSA because, while we might not get to see each other on a day-to-day basis, when the chips are down and you need help, the whole tribe comes running.

What did you do before coming to PSA? I came over to PSA from Piedmont where I was in the training dept. I was an Instation on the job trainer. After new hires came back from training in the hubs, I helped put that training into place.

Why did you come to PSA? I came over to PSA because I was ready for a new challenge and wanted to come off the road.

Tell us something about your role that most people don’t know: I clean the crumbs out of the quiet room chairs.

What has been the most rewarding part of your job? Everyday greeting crews when they come on and off aircraft. Especially when it’s someone who isn’t expecting it.

Tell us something no one knows about you: I recently was diagnosed Asperger’s Syndrome and while I am still learning what that means for me, I know I can count on everyone here at PSA for support and assistance if need be.

The Faces of PSA – Meet Julio Soza

Faces of PSA - JulioSozaName: Julio Soza

Title: Maintenance Supervisor

How long have you worked for PSA? It will be 10 years May 17th.

How long have you been in the airline industry? 16 years.

Give us a brief overview of what you do: As a Maintenance Supervisor, our priority is to make sure we deliver a safe and reliable aircraft to the public on time for departures. On the other hand, equally important is to lead a team of over 100 employees and make sure they are trained and have all the safety equipment to perform our nightly maintenance. We also help other departments coordinate aircraft and parts so we can be successful every night.

What is one of the biggest challenges of your job? One of the biggest challenges is training and mentoring all of the new employees.

How many roles have you had at PSA? Which is your favorite? I started as a Mechanic in 2007, moved up to a Lead Mechanic, and now I’m a Maintenance Supervisor. To be honest, I liked all the positions I have held, they all have their challenges and sometimes I find myself missing some of the aspects of other positions. There’s always something to learn when you go into a new position. When you grow with a company, you see some of the aspects of the company and see more of why things are done the way they are. (With each new role) I get to see the big picture and mentor. I’m aiming to finish up my bachelor’s degree.

Where’s your favorite place you have traveled? Sicily.

What are some of your hobbies? Golfing, watching movies, volunteer work for my church.

What kind of volunteer work do you do? I help set up and take down the surround sound system for mass at my church. I also volunteer for church festivals and help organize retreats as far away as Atlanta.

What do you love about working for PSA? I enjoy the challenges and working with a diverse work force. I like to interact with all the different departments, specifically on daily schedules with planning and CRAs on the parts. Helping arrange non-destructive testing.

Why would you recommend PSA? I would recommend PSA because of its future growth and opportunity to advance.

What did you do before coming to PSA? I served six years in the Air Force working on C-130’s with multiple oversea deployments. The biggest difference is the electronics. The C-130s are simpler; CRJ has a lot more electronically involved.

Tell us something about your role that most people don’t know: They say a mechanic is a “Jack of all trades, master of none,” I feel the same way about the supervisor roll.

What has been the most rewarding part of your job? Each day different challenges come along and you have to solve them in a timely manner. When the aircraft departs on time, this is the most rewarding for me.

Tell us something no one knows about you: I talk to my dog a lot as if he can understand me; he is my best friend after all.

The Faces of PSA – Meet Tine and Raymond Martinelli

raymond and tine martinelliName: Tine Martinelli

Title: First Officer and Pilot Recruiter

How long have you worked for PSA? 2 years

How long have you been in the airline industry? Where did you work before PSA? About 10 years, I worked for an international flight school in the Phoenix area, and flew for ExpressJet before joining PSA. I initially started as a dispatcher at the flight school, and worked my way up to scheduler and system administrator. I did like working with international students, it was very interesting to learn about their cultures, and how some things are very similar to the US, while others are completely different. I’m also very interested in foreign languages, so I enjoyed the students teaching me some words and sayings in their native languages. We had Belgian students too, so it was nice to be able to speak Dutch to them every once in a while (only during break though). They were required to speak English at all times during training, even among themselves) and talk about what kind of candy from home we missed the most!

What brought you to PSA? The opportunities for personal and professional growth.

Give us a brief overview of what you do: I assist the Captain in getting our passengers to their destination safely and efficiently. As a pilot recruiter, I represent PSA Airlines at recruiting events, aviation career fairs and college visits.

Is it difficult to be a pilot from another country flying in the U.S.? I don’t feel like it is particularly difficult to be a pilot from a different country flying in the U.S., but I’ve lived in the U.S. for almost eight years now and I’d like to think I’ve adapted well. Some things are different, and sometimes it comes in handy to know the differences, small things. For example, in Europe, they call the ramp the apron, so it didn’t catch me by surprise when the first time I flew into Canada (with my previous airline). Tower told me to “contact apron.”

What made you want to become a pilot? When I was 12, my father moved to Hong Kong for three years for his job, so my mom, my brother and I would go visit as much as we could, usually every school break. Before 9/11, airlines usually didn’t have a problem letting people (especially kids) go up front to see the cockpit and talk with the pilots during flight. On one of those trips, my brother and I were invited to sit on the jumpseat of a Cathay Pacific B747 for the approach and landing into Kai Tak airport in Hong Kong, which was a challenging approach. It involved aiming the plane at an orange and white checkerboard painted on a hillside, followed by a steep turn, maneuvering in between skyscrapers to line up with the runway. And that was it, I was hooked, I was going to be a pilot. This story is part of why I like to invite kids up to the flight deck before or after a flight, let them sit in the seat, take their picture, give them a set of wings. You never know how big of an impact that’s going to make. I know it made a huge impression on me all these years ago.

What is one of the biggest challenges of your job? Since (my husband) Ray also works at PSA, it hasn’t always been easy to line up our schedules, but being able to take advantage of the Schedule Adjustment Period has made a big difference.

Where’s your favorite place you have traveled? Hong Kong is one of my favorites. Bali was amazing and the Grand Canyon is impressive.

What are some of your hobbies? I like to go hiking with our two dogs. I also enjoy cooking and baking.

What do you love about working for PSA? I absolutely love the people I work with; I have made some friends for life here at PSA.

Would you recommend PSA and why? Yes, we work with great people, and PSA’s growth offers tremendous opportunities that other companies might not.

What has been the most rewarding part of your job? It’s great to meet prospective candidates at career fairs and industry events, and then running into them several months later at the airport as newly minted PSA pilots.

Tell us something no one knows about you: Up until a few days ago, I would have said ‘Very few people know I won a scholarship at Women in Aviation this year’, but I guess the cat is out of the bag now.

Name: Raymond Martinelli

Title: Captain/Aircrew Program Designee

How long have you worked for PSA? 5.5 years

How long have you been in the airline industry? PSA is the first 121 Carrier I have worked for.

Where did you work before PSA? Before PSA, I worked at CAE as an initial pilot instructor.

What brought you to PSA? When I was hired in 2011, PSA was approximately 380 pilots and had the small company feel I was looking for.

Give us a brief overview of what you do: I work in the simulator, training initial pilots, conduct recurrent training and perform initial check rides. I work part time with fleet management, which is responsible for keeping PSA’s pilot manuals up to date. I also enjoy flying the line as a Captain when I have the chance.

What is one of the biggest challenges of your job? Lining up my days off with Tine.

Where’s your favorite place you have traveled? This is an easy one, Catalina Island, California.

What are some of your hobbies? Rock crawling, restoring classic cars and hiking with the dogs.

What do you love about working for PSA? The people I work with and the opportunities I believe I wouldn’t have had at other companies.

Would you recommend PSA and why? Yes, lots of opportunities.

Tell us something about your role that most people don’t know: Lots of paper work!!!!

What has been the most rewarding part of your job? The look on the face of a student when they get their initial ATP/type.

Tell us something no one knows about you: I don’t like mayonnaise.

PSA Airlines and SkyWarrior Sign Rotor Transition Program Agreement

PSA leadership and members of the recruiting team with representatives from SkyWarrior.

PSA Airlines and SkyWarrior Inc. formally signed an industry-leading Rotor Transition Program agreement helping military rotor pilots transition to commercial aviation. PSA is partnering with Pensacola-based SkyWarrior and will contribute up to $23,000 toward flight-time requirements to help military rotor pilots achieve Restricted-Airline Transport Pilot (R-ATP) certification. Most military rotor pilots qualify for the Federal Aviation Administration’s lowest-minimum R-ATP. Although many of these pilots have the 750-hour total time, they fall short of the 250-hour fixed-wing Pilot in Command (PIC) requirement or 25-hour multi-engine requirement.

PSA’s Rotor Transition Program is different from other programs and offers more to pilots in the flexibility and affordability of the program. The program offers pilots the choice on how to fund getting flight hours and no GI bill use is required. Pilots can also build hours on their time, as long as it is completed in three months. Partnering with SkyWarrior also provides pilots the most competitive price-per-flight-hour in an affordable location, Pensacola, FL.

PSA’s new Rotor Transition Program initiative is just one way PSA Airlines offers the most comprehensive benefits to its pilots. PSA Airlines is the fastest-growing regional airline in the country, and with a true pilot flow through agreement to American, a career as a mainline pilot for the largest airline in the world can start with this program. For more information, click here.

About PSA Airlines

PSA Airlines operates an all-jet fleet consisting of exclusively Bombardier regional jet aircraft. The company’s 3,000 employees operate nearly 700 daily flights to nearly 90 destinations. Headquartered in Dayton, Ohio, PSA also has flight crew bases located in Dayton, Cincinnati, Ohio, Knoxville, Tennessee, Washington, D.C., and Charlotte, North Carolina. PSA has maintenance facilities in Dayton and Canton, Ohio and Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Airport and Charlotte, North Carolina. PSA operates 35 Bombardier CRJ200 aircraft, 26 Bombardier CRJ700 aircraft and 54 Bombardier CRJ900 aircraft. The airline expects to add additional aircraft to its fleet in the next two years, bringing its fleet count to 150.

The Faces of PSA – Meet Kelli Hamilton

kelli hamiltonName: Kelli Hamilton

Title: Crew Planner

How long have you worked for PSA? Almost 7 years. I started in May 2010.

How long have you been in the airline industry? I’ve been in the airline industry for 17 years. My love for the airline industry began with Spirit Airlines. In my 10 years at Spirit, the majority of my time was in Myrtle Beach, SC where I was an Operations Supervisor. I was also a MYR-based Flight Attendant for about a year and a Crew Scheduler in their headquarters in Miramar, FL.

Give us a brief overview of what you do: It’s hard to briefly describe what we do in Crew Planning. There is so much that goes into it, but the very short answer is we create and award the monthly schedules for Pilots and Flight Attendants.

What is one of the biggest challenges of your job? One of my biggest challenges is that, with the rapid growth of PSA, my job is constantly changing. All the changes are what keeps me motivated and keeps my job interesting. So even though it is a challenge, it’s what drives me to be better.

How many roles have you had at PSA? Which is your favorite? I was a Crew Scheduler for two years before becoming a Crew Planner. I would have to say Planning is my favorite of the two.

Where’s your favorite place you have traveled? It’s a tie between St. Maarten and Dublin, Ireland.

What are some of your hobbies?  I really enjoy photography and I love going to concerts. Green Day is one of my favorite bands. I go to Rock on the Range every year.

What do you love about working for PSA? I’ve met some of my favorite people here and I know that I’ve made life-long friends. I also love that my parents get flight benefits, they are quite the experts at non-revving!

What did you do before coming to PSA? I was going to school for nursing and working at a hospital, but after two years, I realized that I’d never be happy with that career. I missed the Airline industry too much. It’s in my blood and now I can’t imagine ever doing anything else.

Tell us something about your role that most people don’t know: We’re basically putting together a giant puzzle every month. Sometimes the pieces fit perfectly and sometimes we have to analyze and create several different scenarios to produce the best possible outcome.

What has been the most rewarding part of your job? What I find most rewarding is the amount of knowledge I’ve gained in my role at PSA. I am proud to be part of a team that has the same dedication to the airline that I have and the determination for PSA to succeed.

Tell us something no one knows about you: I worked at Cedar Point for two summers when I was in college.